Common Risk Factors for Hip Replacement

hip replacement surgery

As the age passes by, the body starts expressing the effects of natural aging process in the form of deformities. When your joints start aching and do not support movement, you know that you are not just getting older, but there’s a need to take some actions which will help you to continue doing things that you love and enjoy life. A bad hip joint may be obstructing your way. Modern science has blessed humanity with advanced surgeries like total hip replacement to help you get over the pain and limiting movement. In reality, these replacement surgeries are not just related to the elderly, they are equally beneficial for people of all ages with a worn hip joint.

Hip Replacement

Hip is one such joint in the human body that if it is affected by arthritis, it leaves the person in constant suffering and pain, especially if the case involves osteoarthritis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in four women and one in five men are exposed to lifetime risk of hip arthritis, which may require a hip replacement surgery for relief.

What are the risk factors that trigger a bad hip?

There can be several reasons which can contribute to a bad hip. Here are some of the risk factors highlighted by orthopedic specialists which are known to trigger a bad hip.

Developing Osteoarthritis in Hip: 

Arthritis is one of the most common causes for hip pain. This inflammation of joints is known to be worse when you wake up and gradually settles down as you start becoming active during the day. Further it begins to worsen with time.

Developing Osteoarthritis in Hip

Hip is supposed to be the most vulnerable joint in the body to develop arthritis, and osteoarthritis in particular. The risk of developing hip osteoarthritis prevails more in women than men. Yet as we grow older, the hips are getting weary and fatigued while carrying the most of our body weight daily. This imposes great pressure on the cartilage present in the joint area. As the cartilage degrades with excess weight and aging, the person gets the risk of having a constant complaint of pain in the hip region.

Excessive Body Weight and higher Body Mass Index (BMI):

BMI

BMI is a measure of body fat which is calculated from your weight in relation to your height. Higher BMI can be associated with an increased risk with the success of hip replacement surgery. Your body weight is largely supported by your limbs and hence excess weight adds to the strain that your hip joints are exposed to. This further adds to the risk of developing osteoarthritis. The outcome of this can be as severe as stopping your hip movement to the extent that the person starts avoiding your daily routine activities.

Family History of Arthritis:

Almost 50 percent of hip arthritis cases may be found related to inherited genetics. This can be either in the form of a family member with identified osteoarthritis problem or in the form of having genes for poor bone health, thereby causing the condition of arthritis.

A Hip Trauma in the Past:

In case you had faced a severe hip injury in the past, it might trigger your hip pain with aging. This may further increase your risk for osteoarthritis as well.

Amount of Physical Activity as Part of Daily Routine: 

Physical Activity

Walking, running, exercising, doing household chores and so on, are some types of the physical activities. Physical activity adds excessive strain on your hips. Thus there is higher chance of having the need for hip replacement. This excess strain also causes wear and tear in the hip joints thus resulting in constant ongoing pain. This exposes your hip joints to higher risk of injury and thereby the need for undergoing a hip replacement surgery later.

Benefits of Hip Replacement

Hip replacement surgery has been proven to offer great relief in pain and considerable mobility in patients who are suffering from osteoarthritis or inflammatory arthritis of the hip region. More than 90% of patients get relief from pain and the increased mobility for around 10 years and many of them would have it functioning even for 20 years.

Still, whenever you get a hip pain which doesn’t go away after your basic treatments like some exercises, local application of some gel or ointment for pain relief, it is highly recommended that you visit an orthopedic specialist for a consultation and explore the options suggested by the expert. However, no pain should be ignored and timely actions are a great help in keeping your body fit and active.

Five Tips That Will Help You Improve Your Spinal Health

Improve Your Spinal Health

Improve Your Spinal Health

As per stats, there are many people who carry out the back pain every day. While living the pain daily life, it may prevent you from enjoying the social life and ability to achieve your daily tasks.

We will explain few simple tips and stretches which can help you to take care of your spine. These tips will surely help you to lower the chances of back pain later.

1. Stretching Exercise

Stretching Exercise

Getting out some time to focus on the flexible body and that can only be achieved by different stretch exercise. There are many kinds of stretches that can help you to keep your body flexible and healthy. You may follow these simple stretches step, to keep your spine healthy:

i. Stand with your feet hip distance apart and your knees slightly bent.

ii. Interlock your fingers behind your back (as per your comfort, no matter if your fingers don’t touch, you may still keep it practicing while holding them on to a dish towel.). Now, simply breathe-in and straighten your arms to expand your chest.

iii. Exhale and bend at your waist, letting your hands stretch towards your head. Hold for 10 seconds or 5 deep breaths.

2. Getting A Good Massage

Getting A Good Massage

Many of us don’t know the actual benefits of massage as it really helps to keep your spine healthy as well as general stress. Getting a good massage increases the endorphins (a natural painkiller of the body) in your bloodstream and resultant it cuts down your pain medications.

Massage also encourages the blood circulation that brings restorative nutrients to the affected area and speeds up the healing.

3. Stay Hydrated

Stay Hydrated

As per studies, dehydration may lead to many problems in the body including your joints and spine. Spinal discs are vulnerable due to dehydration and may begin to lose height. Hence spinal discs begin to shrink and you become predictable to painful spinal disc. Herniated Disc, also called a slipped or ruptured disc. A herniated disc occurs when your spinal disks lose some of their water content.

According to an Orthopaedic Surgeon, Herniated disks most common causes are, sometimes, using your back muscles instead of your leg and thigh muscles to lift large, heavy objects can lead to a herniated disk, as can twisting and turning while lifting objects. The most common signs and symptoms of herniated disks are arm or leg pain, numbness or tingling, and weakness.

4. Get a Healthy Sleep

Get a Healthy Sleep

Getting a healthy sleep is an integral part of your overall health. Your body & muscles need a good night’s sleep to repair the muscles and skin itself. As per Orthopaedic Surgeons, it is highly recommended to sleep on your side and on your stomach. Your spine feels high when you sleep on your stomach while sleeping on your side helping to avoid sleep apnea symptoms and diminishes upper airway collapse and gives you an improved night’s rest.

Using a good quality mattress and pillow also helps you to maintain the alignment of your neck.

5. Maintain Healthy Weight 

Maintain Healthy Weight

It is advised to maintain a healthy weight to living an active, healthy, and energetic life. People with overweight and obese have an increased risk for spinal pain, joint pain, and muscle strain.

Especially, people with overweight are most likely to experience lower back or spinal problem than people with healthy weight level. People with overweight around their belly pulls the pelvis forward, strains the low back and create the low back pain.

You can maintain your healthy weight by doing exercise and a healthy diet plan.

Common Exercises after Joint Replacement Surgery

Joint Replacement Surgery

Joint Replacement Surgery, also known as Replacement arthroplasty, requires an orthopedic surgery for treating arthritic or dysfunctional joint surface by replacing it with an orthopedic prosthesis. When a surgeon prescribes and schedules such Joint Replacement Surgery, physiotherapy and some exercises are usually prescribed as pre and post-surgery routine.

Exercise after joint replacement surgery

Why exercise after joint replacement surgery?

Until you understand the necessity and significance of the role exercises play in the recovery and success of the undergone arthroplasty, it is quite difficult to keep yourself pushing to do the exercises. Usually patients are made to walk from day one, initially very short distances, then performing light activities, and later walking outdoors and even climbing stairs. The increase in movement has to be gradual so as to make the new prosthesis get adjusted in the body.

Exercises play a significant role in strengthening the muscles and improving knee movement. When you feel uncomfortable while doing the exercise, don’t worry since there is some amount of discomfort when you start with it. However, on the other hand, these exercises are a definite help in speeding up the recovery and quickly diminish the postoperative pain.

Common Exercises recommended after Joint Replacement Surgery

It is quite probable for a patient to understand what exercises should be done at this stage. Below are some of the exercises which a patient can practice after undergoing a joint replacement surgery.

Exercises after Joint Replacement Surgery

  1. Ankle Pumps and Circles: Bend your ankles up, stretching your toes inwards (towards you) and then bend both ankles down pointing your toes outwards. For circles, rotate each foot clockwise and anticlockwise while keeping them facing the ceiling.
  2. Thigh Squeezes: Also known as Quadriceps sets, you start with tightening the muscles on the front of your thigh while pushing the back side of your knee into the bed (surface). Hold for a while and relax. 
  3. Buttock Squeezes or Gluteal Sets: Simply, tighten the muscles of your buttocks by squeezing the muscles together. Hold for a while and relax. 

    Excercises

  4. Heel Slides: Slowly bend your hip and knee by sliding your heel upwards towards your buttocks. Keep the heel surfaced on the bed while moving it. Now, slide your heel back down to the starting position. Repeat with the other leg. If you feel the friction in sliding the heel, you could place a plastic bag under your heel to make it slide easily. 
  5. Lying and Sitting Kicks: These kicks are also helpful in recovery and relief from pain.

In addition to exercising, walking is equally important in building your strength and endurance. You should know clearly about how much you should walk and how the amount of walk and exercise needs to be gradually increased so that you don’t overdo it. At any point, advice of orthopedic surgeon and physiotherapist is highly recommended since they know the details of the surgery and patients’ case history.