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Effects of stress on skin and hair

Leading a stressful life? Unfortunately, it shows on your skin and hair, says an expert. Pankaj Chaturvedi, dermatologist and specialist hair transplant surgeon at MedLinks, a centre for skin and hair treatment, shares what stress can do to skin and hair:
* Acne: Since our skin and mind are deeply connected; the moment stress hormones are released, oil production in the skin increases and leads to acne breakouts.
* Ageing: It is easy to identify people who are stressed because the signs of ageing such as wrinkles and dark circles start to show on their face much earlier than they should.
*Hair loss: Due to stress, our blood vessels get constricted and the hair follicles are unable to get the required quantity of oxygen and other nutrients, which are necessary for hair growth. Lack of nutrients often leads to hair loss for various people who are stressed.

Here are some of the best ways to reduce stress:
* Get a nice massage. It will help to relax your body and open all the blocked energy channels.
* Exercise for some time. It motivates you and lifts your mood. It helps to energise you and is the key to a healthy body.
* Meditate for at least 15 to 20 minutes per day. You can do it any time, any place at your convenience. Sitting in peace can help you to focus your thoughts and help release stress.
* Eat small frequent meals and eat healthy food. Some foods that are really good for busting stress include almonds, blueberries and salmon.
* Sleep for at least eight hours. Lack of sleep makes a person cranky and irritable. Nothing can beat a good night's sleep in releasing stress.

ISB launches programme for healthcare professionals

ISB launches programme for healthcare professionals

The Indian School of Business (ISB), with campuses in Mohali and Hyderabad, is all set to launch a one-of-its-kind healthcare management programme (HMP), to groom doctors and healthcare professionals to deliver excellence in healthcare management and to enable them to move into leadership positions in the near future and drive the growth of the sector.
The one year part-time programme, which will commence in January 2016, has been designed and developed by the Max Institute of Healthcare Management and the Centre for Executive Education at the ISB.
Analjit Singh, founder, Max India Group and founder supporter, Mohali campus of ISB, said, “There is a serious paucity of well-trained quality healthcare management professionals in India. The impressive increase in investment and capacity of the private healthcare industry in India in the last few years, accentuates this shortage.”
Announcing the programme, Ajit Rangnekar, dean, ISB, said, “The healthcare sector in India has reacted to numerous challenges in the sector with some very positive responses, including new delivery models, innovative business practices and investments in niche areas. A major consequence has been the professionalization of the sector, thus creating a huge demand for management professionals.”
The HMP has been designed in close collaboration with the healthcare sector, practicing professionals and academia. An Academic Advisory Council, comprising eminent faculty from across the world, provides academic oversight and an Industry Advisory Council that includes senior leaders from organizations like Max Healthcare Global Hospitals, Fortis Healthcare Ltd, Care Hospitals, and Narayana Netralaya brings in the industry perspective.

Get 8 hours of sleep to improve your memory

Get 8 hours of sleep to improve your memory

Do you want to better remember new names and faces? Go, hit the sack. According to researchers, people are better at remembering faces and names if they get 8 hours of sound sleep after seeing those faces and names for the first time.
Many different kinds of memories are improved with sleep.
While a couple of studies have looked at how naps might affect our ability to learn new faces and names, no previous studies have looked at the impact of a full night of sleep in between learning and being tested.
"We found that when participants were given the opportunity to have a full night's sleep, their ability to correctly identify the name associated with a face - and their confidence in their answers- significantly improved," explained Jeanne F Duffy, associate neuroscientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH).
Participants in the study underwent testing in a controlled environment while staying at BWH's centre for clinical investigation.
They were shown 20 photos of faces with corresponding names from a database of over 600 colour photos of adult faces and asked to memorise them.
After a 12-hour period, they were then shown the photos again with either a correct or incorrect name.
In addition to answering whether or not the correct name was shown, participants were asked to rate their confidence on a scale of one to nine.
When given an opportunity to sleep for up to 8 hours, participants correctly matched 12 per cent more of the faces and names.
The findings suggest that sleep after new learning activities may help improve memory.
While the current study was conducted on healthy subjects in their 20s, the research team would like to explore the implications for people of all ages, including older adults.
"Sleep is important for learning new information. As people get older, they are more likely to develop sleep disruptions and sleep disorders, which may, in turn, cause memory issues," Duffy noted.
By addressing issues with sleep, we may be able to affect people's ability to learn things at all different ages, the authors concluded in a paper appeared in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Delhi infant does not have paralysis-causing polio virus, clarifies Union Health Ministry

Delhi infant does not have paralysis-causing polio virus, clarifies Union Health Ministry

With an infant in Delhi being diagnosed with a strain of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), the Union Health Ministry on Tuesday said the case should not be confused with the wild poliovirus that was responsible for paralysis of thousands of children until it was eradicated from India in 2011. “India continues to remain free of wild poliovirus. The occurrence of this case should not be confused with the wild poliovirus that was responsible for paralysis of thousands of children each year until it was eradicated from India in 2011. A VDPV can occur in a person with a rare immunodeficient disorder because the body does not initiate an immune response to the vaccine as a healthy child would,” said a statement issued by the Health Ministry.
The occurrence of an VDPV is an extremely rare phenomenon and only about 100 cases with immunodeficiency have been documented to be excreting VDPVs globally since 1961. “Ongoing poliovirus surveillance, including environmental surveillance, through sewage sample testing in the area has not revealed any poliovirus circulation in the area,” said the Ministry, adding in line with the WHO guidelines for response to VDPVs to mitigate the risk of its spread, it has conducted a polio round between November 6-10 in the adjoining areas to immunise all children under 5 years.
The diagnosis of P2 strain, considered the strongest of the three strains of poliovirus, was confirmed on November 3.
According to Delhi Health Minister Satyendra Jain this was an individual case which is being investigated. The last recorded case of VDPV was reported from Beed, Maharashtra, in 2013. Vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) are rare strains of poliovirus that have genetically mutated from the strain contained in the oral polio vaccine, according to Global Polio Eradication Initiative.
The oral polio vaccine contains a live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine-virus. When a child is vaccinated, the weakened vaccine-virus replicates in the intestine and enters into the bloodstream, triggering a protective immune response in the child.
Like wild poliovirus, the child excretes the vaccine-virus for a period of six to eight weeks. Importantly, as it is excreted, some of the vaccine-virus may no longer be the same as the original vaccine-virus as it has genetically altered during replication. This is called a vaccine-derived poliovirus.

Winter ailments: 5 home remedies to look out for

Winter ailments: 5 home remedies to look out for

Keeping warm during winter is not easy. It is at this time of the year, people get more prone to bacteria and viruses that produce toxins causing colds, cough, influenza and other common diseases.
To beat these illnesses, experts recommend adapting to certain natural remedies which can help a lot apart from wearing woolen clothes.
Here are top 5 natural remedies to beat the chill:
Ginger tea for cough
It is very helpful in treating cough and sore throat associated with colds. Also, chewing a piece of ginger tossed in honey helps relieve the severity of nausea.
Chicken soup for cold
Chicken soup can actually help you say bye-bye to cold as it breaks down the mucus thereby easing the respiratory process. Apart from this, chicken soup is loaded with carbohydrates which keep you energetic.
Aloe Vera mask for dry skin
Aloe vera has immense benefits when it comes to skin as it has antioxidants and vitamins which will leave a perfect glow on your skin that you always longed for thereby repairing skin cells.

Saunf for constipation
Helps cool the lining of the stomach. Due to its anti-ulcer properties, it aids in digestion and relieves constipation.
Eucalyptus oil for nasal congestion
Due to its anti-bacterial and anti-fungal qualities, eucalyptus oil is used to treat respiratory problems like sinus, cough, cold, asthma, bronchitis and even nasal congestion.

Good news for diabetics! Low GI rice variety identified

Good news for diabetics! Low GI rice variety identified

Rice will no more be a ‘villain’ for diabetic patients as researchers in Chhattisgarh have identified a high-yielding variety of white rice with low Glycemic Index (GI) — measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels.
The finding is not only advantageous for people with diabetes, or at a risk of the disease, it can also be a part of a healthy diet for the average consumers, experts feel.
A team of researchers from Indira Gandhi Agriculture University (IGAU) Raipur, led by Department of Plant Molecular and Biotechnology’s Professor Dr Girish Chandel, has identified the variety of low GI rice, which is expected to be released next month at a commercial level.
“Since past few years we have been working to develop or identify a rice variety with low GI that could be fruitful for sugar patients. Interestingly, we found it on the ‘Chapati Gurmatiya’ race of rice, which is a traditional cultivated variety of paddy in Chhattisgarh,” Dr Chandel told PTI.
He said that this new development is significant as rice is a staple diet for a big population.
People can’t give it up in Chhattisgarh, which is popularly known as a ‘rice bowl’, as well as in the entire country because food habits are an entrenched cultural habit which is difficult to change, he said.
But consumption of white rice with GI more than permissible limits can be harmful for diabetic patients. Keeping this in view, the research was taken up, he said.
“During the research, data was collected by mouse feeding trial at Chhattisgarh Council of Science and Technology. The mouse model data clearly demonstrated that the effect of low GI rice on a diabetic mouse was similar to that on another diabetic mouse who was injected with sugar control drug,” he said.

Air pollution: What it can do to your kid’s health and steps to reduce risk!

Air pollution: What it can do to your kid’s health and steps to reduce risk!

Air pollution is becoming a major environmental health problem affecting individuals of all age groups. Air pollutants when inhaled can have serious impact on human health, affecting lungs and the respiratory system as well as the heart.
Air pollution consists of several main types of pollutants – particulate matter (PM10 or PM 2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO).
Adverse health effects in children

  • Air pollution makes your child’s asthma symptoms worse
  • It can increase respiratory infections
  • It can decrease lung function
  • It can make children more sensitive to allergens
  • Air pollutants increases mortality risks for those living in highly polluted areas
  • It can increase sickness rates

What you can do to reduce the risk

  • Check air pollution levels in your area and plan accordingly
  • Avoid outdoor activities when smog levels are high
  • If kids must go outside, try rescheduling energetic activities for early morning
  • Ensure kids put on anti-pollution masks when outdoors
  • Make sure that your child drink lots of fluids (water and natural fruit juices) when it is hot
  • Try to avoid peak rush hours when pollution levels are highest
  • Know your child’s health - if your kid has asthma or other respiratory conditions, monitor the situation with your doctor and take appropriate precautionary measures.
Suffering from severe headache? Try these five yoga poses!

Suffering from severe headache? Try these five yoga poses!

Do you often feel that pounding in your head? That pounding is nothing but headache. It has become very common and usually happens because of dehydration, tension, stress or a hangover. Well, one can relieve its symptoms with the help of simple yoga poses.
Here are some yoga poses to relieve headache:
Seated spinal twist
This pose helps in getting rid of headache and back pain as it increases the flexibility in upper body while stretching the shoulders, hips, and neck. It also improves your posture and spine mobility.
Cat pose
This pose helps you get rid of headache as it relieves tension in the spine, shoulders and neck. It also boosts circulation in the upper body.
Child’s pose
Child’s pose can be the most powerful remedy for stress, anxiety and headaches. This pose helps us to quiet our mind while releasing tension from the back and shoulders.
Upside-down seal
Upside-down seal is one of the best pose for headache and anxiety. It helps us to quiet mind which further prevents and reduces the impact of headaches.
Deep breathing
One of the best and easy pose of yoga is deep breathing. Breathing make us get relieved from severe headache by releasing tension in the shoulders and bring more oxygen into the brain.